2022 Fakequity Omicron-endured Checklist

2022 Fakequity Omicron-endured checklist, pink background with gold stars

This week’s post isn’t the blog’s normal deeper dive into race or social justice issues. Like many others, I’m feeling the feels of 2022 COVID and omicron life. So instead of feeling sad let’s be honest about where we’re at and maybe poke a little fun at life too.

Give yourself one point for every item on the list you feel pertains to you.

  1. Frantically look up omicron symptoms on the internet. Wonder what alphabet officials will use next after they exhaust Greek letters. Better start learning the different alphabets and tones in Asian languages.
  2. Overbuying N95/KN95/KF94 facemasks. Is this the new toilet paper hoarding?
  3. The COVID19 rapid test you placed in your online cart are sold out when you’re ready to pay
  4. Barter for a COVID19 rapid test
  5. Your school pivots to remote learning. Bonus point if you discover your kid didn’t bring home a charger.
  6. Employers mandate travel with no disability accommodations
  7. Your phone app notifies you of a COVID exposure
  8. Says “This is crazy!” *Crazy should not be used as a synonym for dysfunctional (see ableism BINGO board)
  9. Someone you know whines about canceling their cruise or vacation to Mexico
  10. Someone talks about their temporary disability from working from home and too much screen time
  11. Sidewalk curb cuts are blocked by snow, rain, debris, unpicked up trash or recycling (postponed due to the weather), etc.
  12. You know someone who signed up to temporarily sub in a school – Hooray! Minus 1 point, Minus 10 if it is you doing the subbing.
  13. Ask on Facebook where to get a COVID booster. If you’re not on Facebook, you wonder if now is the time to reopen that dormant account to crowdsource an answer.
  14. FDA approves fourth or fifth or sixth booster
  15. Sees the headlines asking for blood donations and make an appointment – thank you
  16. Supply chain disrupts your order of books to prepare for MLK day, better order now before Juneteenth
  17. Watch TikTok vids and feel afraid for the next generation but you stay stuck watching TikTok for five minutes straight.
  18. Blindingly bright virtue signals by white folx who yielded a vaccine dose for gasp a POC
  19. Columbusing/discovering ethnic grocery stores because the local whole foods is out of stock
  20. Question if the amount of rain/snow/sun right now is related to climate change. Bonus point if you’re in the Pacific Northwest and experiencing the atmospheric river.
  21. Watched Encanto for the fourth time. Bonus if you have the We Don’t Talk About Bruno song now stuck in your head.
  22. Check COVID dashboards and marvel at the upward trajectory of the lines
  23. Ignore a school robocall, ignore a work email asking for something immediately since it is 2022 and everything is immediate but not really
  24. Deliver treats to your local school, they need a pick-me-up, minus 2
  25. Reschedule travel plans
  26. Reschedule a mahjong gathering (or other gathering)
  27. Walk the pandemic puppy, pet your pandemic cat, or feed your pandemic sourdough starter
  28. Wonder when Girl Scout cookies will be on sale again. Soon very soon! Find your favorite POC Girl Scout to place an order. If you don’t eat cookies, order them for a local school, they will appreciate the treats.
  29. Watch dog/cat/panda videos or this video of ostriches running on a city street (I’ve watched it multiple times)
  30. Register to Vote, update your voter registration address, or get someone registered. Minus five points if you do this. Seattle voters – be ready for the upcoming February ballot with two school levies on it.

1-10 points: You’re doing all right.

11-22 (22 because it is 2022) points: Hang in there. 2022 can only get better, right?

23+ points: Virtual hug to you. Go watch Encanto and look forward to eating Girl Scout cookies from the POC Girl Scout troop.

Special thanks to my almost twin Bao and KY for their help. Bao inspired this by creating a 2022 Blissful Pandemonium BINGO board that made many of us laugh and cry. Thank you to many others who inspired lines, including Carrie Basas who wrote the original Abelism BINGO where I stole and borrowed points from.

In 2022 I hope all of us find and keep friends as special as they are. We need each other and need to protect, care for, and love each other hard to come out of this pandemic together. This is the real lesson of this blog post, thanks for making it to the end of the post.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

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If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up-to-date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

2022 Fakequity Pledge — Home Edition

Fakequity Pledge 2022 – Home edition Picture of a black and white blanket in the background and a black coffee mug on a white and gold coaster

For the past four years, Fakequity has published an annual pledge. This is an annual list of things to think about and pledge to do better in the coming year. After writing the pledge for four years, I had a minor freakout about how to make this year’s pledge fresh and new. I almost thought about not doing it this year, yet as always happens while walking and listening to a podcast the thought of home. It feels like a fitting focus due to continued COVID pandemic life and the continued need to not gather and spread COVID’s omicron variant.

SOME NOTES: When I say home, I encourage you to define home in ways that work for you. Home can be the literal and physical place, or it can be extended to other places that you feel connected to. Some pledge points are meant to appreciate the neighborhood and city where you live, not just your physical home. Do not feel like you have to pledge to all of them at the same time. This is meant to be personal to each of us and to be used as a way of resetting or discovering new ways of deepening our commitments to racial justice and anti-racism.

In 2022 I pledge to:

  1. Know whose land I am on – learn about Native/Indigenous rights, lands, and people. Read the treaty/ies between the tribe who’s land your home is on and the government. (With thanks to J.L. for teaching me about the importance of Native treaties.)
  2. Correctly say the name of who’s land you are on – properly pronounce the tribe and nation names of Native and Indigenous people.
  3. Not use the word decolonize unless your Native/Indigenous. Example, I will not say “I will decolonize my diet/bookshelf/backyard plants,” “We decolonized our Thanksgiving by…” Native/Indigenous people have asked non-Natives not to use the word decolonize as a metaphor (see link).
  4. Learn about my personal culture by reading a book, watching a movie or documentary, listening to music by a creator who identifies the same. Understanding our personal culture and beliefs is important to understanding others.
  5. Cull my books and media (e.g. podcast, social media feeds, apps, etc.) for items that no longer fit your racial beliefs. As an example, growing up I loved the Little House on the Prairie books. As an adult I’ve learned more about the author’s beliefs about Native Americans and choosing not to keep them. Same for the Harry Potter series due to the author’s transphobic beliefs.
  6. Name, call out or call in, people who say or perpetuate racism, especially when it happens in our homes.
  7. Shop at POC locally owned businesses, perhaps in walking distance to your house to invest hyper-locally.
  8. Learn about how housing contributes to generational wealth and racial wealth disparities.
  9. Make my home more accessible – clearly list house numbers, if people are picking up things from your house and you have stairs offer to move the item to a more accessible spot, keep sidewalks clear, request the city put in curb cuts, etc.
  10. Walk the neighborhood. When we walk we discover new things about the neighborhood and can grow connections and appreciation for the diversity in it. Recently I noticed a huge heritage tree in someone’s back yard. This tree is over 100 years old. Had I been in the car I wouldn’t have noticed. While this doesn’t have a lot to do with race, it helped me appreciate, discover, and be open to learning more about the neighborhood overall. While not everyone is physically able to walk, tailor this point to however you choose to appreciate your neighborhood outside of the normal.
  11. Appreciate local street art, especially by artist of color. Bonus: research the artist or art, especially if the art is featuring a person of color.
  12. To remember people make towns/cities/neighborhoods function. Consider the service workers and people who take care of the place you consider home. What is the racial makeup of the people who serve your town/city/neighborhood? (With thanks to @ainamomona on Instagram for sparking this thought.)
  13. Register to vote and vote if you are legally able to. Help others understand local political issues. Follow POC voting guides. Voting in local elections is important for POC interest.
  14. Engage in a meaningful way with the people who make my home possible. Think about the POCs who interact with your house and how to make your home more welcoming for them.
  15. Thank my home for being a space of peace, reflection, and reflection of self. Marie Kondo (KonMari) does this very well if you want some inspiration.

Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

2021 – Recap, a conversation

This is the last blog post for 2021. I’m taking winter break off. Hope you enjoy this tongue-in-cheek recap of the year. I wanted to revisit the year to maybe remember a few wins, a lot of misses, and just reflect in a not-so-serious way.

Friend: How was 2021?

This is what my conversation would sound like if I were telling someone about 2021.

Me: The year started like a bad hangover from 2020. You remember that year, it was the year we stayed home because of COVID-pandemic. It seems like a blur now. There were small glimmers of hope as vaccines were starting to roll out at the end of 2020.

Friend: Oh, yeah I remember. I slept through new year and the first few weeks of 2021. Trump was still president.

Me: Yup, Trump was still in office. If you were sleeping the first few weeks you missed the Jan 6 Insurrection. People, many of them white supremacists took over the Capitol. Like broke windows, forced their way in, then they acted like tourists taking pictures. One dude walked out with a podium, and another guy was dressed wearing horns and red, white, and blue face paint. Get this Trump even said he loved them, after he told them to go home AND they all just walked out, no arrest.

No way that would have happened at a Black Lives Matter peaceful protest.

Friend: Sheesh, that was only Jan 6!

Me: At least in January we got to see Bernie Sanders wearing mittens. He became the best meme of 2021. Amanda Gorman stole the show as the poet laureate at the inauguration. And Kamala Harris became the FIRST African American and Asian VP!

Friend: I miss those Bernie mitten memes.

Me: Spring was better, hope was alive again. People were getting vaccinated. I’ll admit I was super annoyed with all of the white folks who were jumping the COVID vaccine queue cause they HAD to be first in line to get vaccinated.  

Friend: So typical.

Me: Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, had a fascinating interview with Oprah about why they split with the Royal family. At least in my circles it sparked a lot of interesting conversations about race, colorism, and proximity to whiteness.

Friend: Yeah, I wasn’t going to watch it, but I kept hearing about it and how they referred to the royal family as “The firm.” I also had to look up how to curtsy correctly in case I ever meet the Queen. The poor Queen lost her husband too right after that interview aired.

Me: In April Derek Chauvin, the white police officer was found guilty of killing George Floyd. A 22 ½ year sentence, not nearly long enough for taking a Black person’s life.

Friend: I remember that moment. Sadly, right after that, there were more police shootings of Black people. That long arc of justice is hard to find.

It’s only April in this recap?

Me: Ok, we’ll fast forward to May. NBC announced they won’t broadcast the Golden Globes awards due to the lack of diversity. And tennis player Naomi Osaka pulled out of the French Open citing her mental health. This turned out to be a teaser for the summer Olympics and Simone Biles.

Friend: What was going on with COVID around this time.

Me: COVID, right. The euphoria of being vaccinated wore off as the Delta variant came through.

There was also the “heat dome” that blanketed the Pacific Northwest. It was miserable. 109-degrees in June. Climate change is serious! Oregon and the west coast burned. Yet, three rich white men (Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Richard Branson) burned ungodly amounts of fossil fuels to launch themselves into space for kicks and thrills.

Friend: Wasn’t one of the spaceships kinda weird looking? (You can go look it up.)

At least we had the Olympics this year. The GOAT – Simone Biles rocked the world when she took a stand for her mental health.

Me: Gotta fast forward the year. In September lots of kids went back to school. COVID was still raging with people who are unvaccinated, which means it is unsafe for everyone.

Thankfully pediatric vaccines are out now for kids age 5-11 years old. That led to another free-for-all with white parents insisting on being first in line to get their kids vaccinated. Like we didn’t learn the first time we did this.

There was also the US withdrawal in Afghanistan in 2021. Earlier in the year a lot of hard news out of Canada with their First Nations. We have a lot of healing to do.

Friend: Yes, lots of healing.

Me: Nothing huge happened in October. Just a rich white men got richer. Elon Musk made $25-billion in one day. Income inequality, wow. There was also a Facebook outage for six-hours in October – so many people didn’t know what to do during those six hours.

Friend: I heard something about another Greek letter, what was that about?

Me: Omicron. Only 7.5% of people in low-income countries are vaccinated against COVID so new variants popup. Omicron has a lot of mutations; so many unknowns with it. This is how income inequality plays out worldwide.

Oh, also during 2021 (March) there was that ship that blocked the Suez Cannel. Like when I-90 was blocked by a semi. Maybe we should all just stay home for the rest of the year.

Friend: Yeah, but I miss people.

Me: I miss you too, but you need to get your COVID booster and flu shot too, K.

Friend: Ok, see you in 2022. Hopefully, no insurrections, pandemics, or heat domes happen in 2022. Something will happen, cause it always does, but let’s hope for less dramatics.

Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

Relationships — who are you with?

I just finished the book What Happened to You?, which talks about trauma, healing, and the brain. It was fascinating. One of the lessons I took away from it is we are relational beings and others can help us heal and grow. I knew those lessons from before, but reading the book helped to reinforce the message and add deeper nuance. I also learned we gain benefits from small therapeutic moments – healing and therapy doesn’t have to be reserved for once a week in a therapy session.

Relationships

Racial equity work needs relationships to move forward and change. Relationships and stories get encoded in our brain differently. They help us make sense of the world and how we want to relate to others. The bigger lesson I took away from the book is we benefit from having long-lasting relationships in place. For racial equity work this means we need to encourage people to get to know each other and weave support networks for each other. A one-time training won’t shift culture, it won’t fix the problems. Creating the conditions that foster ongoing and long-term relationship buildings can help to develop the resiliency and conditions to tackle tougher persistent problems.

I have my posse of text-a-friend people who help me problem solve things on the fly or exchange a story about something funny. These relationships are with a diverse set of people and over time they’ve shifted my thinking around race, disability, inclusion and other topics. We also sometimes get together in person and enjoy each other in those spaces as well. I hope you can find your posse.

Small and Brief and Ongoing

Racial equity work can happen in big moments, but sometimes those small moments are just as meaningful. Earlier this week I was texting with several different friends about the topic of classroom inclusion. They all provided important insights and differences into how to think about the problem I was facing which I appreciated. Their backgrounds and experiences helped me understand inclusion of disabled people differently which is important to how to react. I appreciated the trust we’ve built up over the years and how on a weeknight evening I could say “Hi, I have a problem can I run something by you?” and they said yes. This small-brief-ongoing nature gave me insights I needed and while not meant to be therapeutic or healing it was.

Alone to think — No Word Volcano-ing

In a different book, I’m currently reading the author writes about loneliness and ironically the counter to loneliness is being comfortable being alone. While I’m grateful to my friends who teach me about race, I also know I need to process some of the info alone – they don’t want me word volcano-ing all the time.

As we move into 2022 let’s find ways to nurture relationships so we can connect more, and create space and time to understand ourselves and others.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

Fakequity 2021 Shopping Guide

Photo by Alizee Marchand on Pexels.com

Welcome to December and cool dates like 12-3-21. In years past I’ve written holiday shopping guides to highlight how we can support POC owned businesses during the holidays. Last year I skipped writing that blog post since websites such as the Intentionalist and other POC shopping guides were abundant. Please continue to use the Intentionalist and consult other lists since each writer and shopper has their biases and will highlight different businesses. I decided to come back to this post since I want to highlight some websites and businesses and sometimes it is nice to get a curated list of recommendations. Many of these recommendations come from friends. All of them have been vetted by either me or someone I know.

Books

We’ll start with an easy category BOOKS! Here are a few favorite POC owned bookstores:

Estelita’s Library, a Black owned organization in Seattle, has a Bookshop.org storefront. Estelita’s recently moved into their own space in the Central District in Seattle. Make sure to check out their social justice library and community space.

Duende District is a popup Latinx bookstore. They also have a Bookshop storefront which makes ordering even easier.

Parable in Tacoma is a community space and bookstore. I’ve linked to their Bookshop storefront.

Mahagony Books is a Black owned bookstore in the DC area. I’ve ordered many books from here for friends and for my annual birthday book drive to donate POC authored books and books about disabilities to public schools.

Birchbark Books in Minneapolis has an incredible selection of Native / Indigenous books. Owned by author Louise Erdrich, Ojibway, her Birchbark book series is a favorite read-aloud for older elementary age kids.

Fakequity has a Bookshop.org affiliate link; Bookshop gives a matching 10% to independent book stores. This has a collection of books I recommend. The proceeds are put into buying POC authored books and books about disabilities to donate to public schools.

Experiences

Even with COVID giving the gift of experiences is a wonderful way to support POC businesses.

  • Buy a gift certificate to a POC owned restaurant. Many restaurants are still hurting because of COVID, coupled with higher labor cost and the increase in food prices, they need our continued support. A few favorites in Seattle:
    • Musang – This Filipino restaurant on Beacon Hill is delicious. Make sure to watch Chef Melissa Miranda’s recent TEDx talk too.
    • Hill City Taphouse – This Asian locally owned taphouse and next to Emma’s BBQ which is Black owned and so delicious, Sam Choy’s Poke is across the street if you want some good Hawaii inspired grinz. Non-alcoholic options are on the menu too. One of the best root beers I ever had was drunk here.
    • Métier Brewing Company is a Black owned brewery, one of the few POC brewers in the nation. Rodney, owner, is also a big biker so give some gift certificates to your favorite cyclist friends. They have non-alcoholic options on the menu for those who need sober options.
    • Boona Boona Coffee is Black / Eritrean owned and a warm delightful place to get a warm drink in Renton or Seattle.  Unsure if they offer gift cards, but you can order their coffee and swag online.
  • POC Cultural Spaces and Museums – During COVID shutdowns many of cultural spaces and museums had to shut their doors or pivoted to less revenue generating online programs. Consider buying a membership as a gift for yourself or someone else to keep these cultural holders surviving during the COVID recovery. Some of these museums and spaces are opening back up with COVID precautions in place. Make sure you’re fully vaccinated and be extra kind to the staff if you visit. A few to consider in the Pacific Northwest:
    • Please also support POC live arts and theatres.
  • Gifts – There are many wonderful POC owned stores
    • Sairen is an Asian women owned business in Japan Town of Seattle. I haven’t been here yet, but several friends said it is worth a visit for gifts. I can’t wait to stop by!
    • For those in Northern climates socks make a perfect gift — Posie Turner socks is POC women owned and each sock has an upbeat message. For the Hawaii slippah wearing crowd we’ll have to find some POC spas to get our toes tuned up.
    • For the wine drinkers in your life check out Wine Savoy. This Black owned business features Black and Native wineries.
    • BT Tram makes AMAZING floral arrangements, Emerald City Flowers. I first met BT through nonprofit work. Recently she’s started a side business making gorgeous flower arrangements. Make sure to follow her social media for pictures that will make you want to treat yourself to flowers.
    • For those who like to gift practical gifts my friend Brooke recommends Celsious laundry products from this Black sister owned business. I mean everyone needs to do laundry, right?
    • 8th Generation in Seattle is a favorite stop to oogle over their Inspired Native arts and gifts.
    • For the cooks, Thyme Well Spent spices from South Sound (PNW) make a delicious gift.
    • Andaluz is always fun for gifts if you’re in the Columbia City neighborhood of Seattle.

If you’re on the hunt for a Christmas tree in Seattle, El Centro de la Raza’s Christmas tree lot is open. The trees are farmed from a local Latinx owned farm.

Give the Gift of Time and Stories

Holiday gifts do not need to be material. Consider doing a small or large volunteer job for a POC neighbor, read about how this organization in Portland is helping Black neighbors age in place.

Make donations to Black, Indigenous, POC, and immigrant led organizations.

With COVID still around the gift of time takes on different meanings. Take time to be in nature and slow down. Consider how we can be thoughtful with gift giving and creating less material and other waste. Take some time to listen to POC stories and share your own journey of learning about race. Connecting is always a meaningful gift.

Final thoughts

Supporting small POC owned businesses and organizations is an important way to support economic justice for POCs. By shopping at POC owned businesses you’re investing in communities of color and their networks. Many times these businesses supporting other POC business owners and their immediate communities.  


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

List of Annoying Things White People Do

Note: No blog next week. I’ll be taking the week off for the holiday week.

This week’s blog post is tongue-in-cheek. Please don’t take it seriously. Like all stereotypes, there are sand grain sizes of truth to the larger oceans of fullness and richness. There are similar lists on the internet, but I wanted to write my own. I came up with the idea before checking online; turns out I’m not as original as I thought. Enjoy, chuckle, don’t take it overly seriously, but if you do see something that resonates ask yourself why.

  1. Put up signs that say “Black Lives Matter,” “Together we believe,” “Hate has no home here,” but do nothing different in their lives to affirm these values or change their behaviors. The only POCs who visit the houses with these signs are housekeepers, dog walkers, or other contractors — yay you for hiring POCs, still eyeroll at the sign but keeping it comfortable by only having paid POCs over.
  2. “I made a donation to the POC organization after I used their service displacing their clients.” No need to announce your good-white-people-status, just do the action and be quiet. We get the virtue signaling.
  3. Love Will Smith. No other Black actors exist by name.
  4. Worship social justice movements.
  5. Use the word equity but refuse to say Black, Brown, people of color, racism, white supremacy.
  6. Believe Jesus and all of Christianity is white. 6.5 Believe Santa is white. 6.6 Wonder why Jesus has 12 disciples and why there are 12 reindeer (k this one isn’t white, this is just me and late night rambling).
  7. Hire Robin DiAngelo and white racial equity speakers and trainers. Learn from white people who will make you uncomfortable but shut down when POCs make you too uncomfortable.
  8. Announce you have a Black friend, married an Asian, live in a diverse neighborhood.
  9. Say they have Black and Brown friends, and they are the ‘good ones.’
  10. Be first to speak in meetings. Must also fill silences in meetings, pauses and awkward silences are just an invitation to fill the talking space.
  11. White people love taking the whole sidewalk space. They rarely shift their bodies to the side when Black people and POCs are walking on the sidewalk too.
  12. Don’t bother learning people’s names – cause Asian women are interchangeable, all Black people look the same, Latinx people only have a handful of names. While we’re at it mispronounce names or give people nicknames because they can’t learn someone’s name that isn’t a name in the top 100 baby name list.
  13. Say All Lives Matter. If you don’t realize why this is offensive, stop reading and do an online search for why this is offensive, go down that research hole — you need it.
  14.  Claim reverse racism. Or at the least announce they are aggrieved because they didn’t get something.
  15. Make equity work depend on more funding.
  16. Only make accessibility happen after a lawsuit.
  17. Threaten lawsuits if they don’t get what they want.
  18. Insist on ‘accountability’ to them.
  19. Refuse to call out other white people for the bad behaviors.
  20. Insist they are perfect and therefore never annoying. Individualism at all times – I’m not annoying like the other white people, but all POCs are one monolithic group.

Thank you to K-Fishie🐠 and Eggplant🍆 for rounding out the list and chuckling with me. The list was written with white and mixed-race POC-white input.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, Kymberli, Kimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

Ask yourself, is this really for me?

Artwork by Sandrine Demathieu from Amplifer Art. Colorful boxes with people flexing their left arms w/ bandaids showing they are vaccinated against COVID19. Different languages with the words Vaccines are Safe.

If you don’t have a lot of time or don’t want to read, just read the title and you’ll get the whole point of the blog post. White people, and people with economic and other privileges, ask yourself “Is this really meant for me?” When deciding to participate in programs designed for POC communities. Sometimes the answer is no even if it isn’t explicitly stated, and sometimes it is yes but do so with care.

This blog post will hopefully be short and to the point, but first a story…

The pediatric COVID vaccine for children 5-11 years old was recently approved for emergency use — Hooray. For many parents/caregivers, this is a welcome relief.

When the adult vaccine came out in late 2020 – early 2021 there isn’t enough supply to meet the demand. This time the government also made a general release of the vaccine – a free for all. During the adult vaccine release government agencies prioritized who would be vaccinated first – medical providers, elders, parents of children with disabilities, etc.

During the adult COVID vaccine rollout, many POC organizations protected the links to schedule COVID appointments. We knew once the links were leaked POC communities would lose out. The appointments would be snatched up by white people and people with privilege. We guarded those appointment links. We texted friends and aunties to check-in and ask if they had gotten their vaccine, if they hadn’t we’d help them sign-up. We may have passed the vaccine clinic info to others but with strict instructions not to post it to social media, if they did they risked being unfriended or at the least not trusted with valuable information again. These are the lengths we had to go through to protect our resources and give our communities a fighting chance to what was rightfully theirs – a fair chance to get vaccinated and not wait until the end. Imagine how much energy we could have redirected if we didn’t have to go through such hoops.

Fast forward to the pediatric COVID vaccine release. There is no prioritization of who should get the pediatric vaccine first – it is a free-for-all and currently, there is a limited supply. Put those two things together and we can see privilege play out in so many ways. For another time we can ask why ourselves why government allowed this to happen.

In one parent Facebook group the phone number for a local POC health clinic was shared. Parents reported waiting for 45-min to 2-hrs on hold to make a COVID pediatric vaccine appointment. Yet these same parents had no idea what the organization does or who it serves. As another friend quietly lamented, “They can spend 2 hours on hold, but not use any of that time to Google?” The parents taking spots at that clinic displaced the clinic’s patients. I heard from one POC immigrant friend who gave up trying to get a vaccine spot there. Another parent pointed out a lot of the families probably couldn’t spend 2-hrs on hold because they don’t have enough pay-as-you-go cellphone minutes, phone privilege is real. This is how privilege shows up. It also meant white bodies are moving through a traditionally POC space — something for white people to think about.

Moral of the Story

If an organization doesn’t sound familiar to you or is embedded in a POC community, pause and ask “Is this really for me?” There is probably a reason you hadn’t heard of the organization before. Is it meant to serve you and your family or are you taking a resource from someone who needs it more?

This isn’t just about COVID vaccines. Those of us with privilege need to constantly be asking ourselves if we are taking from someone else who needs a resource more. A few weeks ago, I was thinking through why I procrastinate signing up for certain kid programs. I had an ‘ah-ha’ moment when I realized I’ve trained myself to not be first in line, to pause and make sure we’re not taking a spot from someone else who is in their target demographic. I don’t want to take a spot that was really designed for another student, my kids will be alright.

Back to the moral. Do some research, pause and ask is it really meant for you or are you taking from someone else. There are times it is ok to sign up and take a resource, other times maybe we should step back and let others go first. At the very least if you do some research you’ll probably learn about a great new organization.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S., Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, Kimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

13 realizations about white people this week

Happy Diwali. Light and prosperity to our relations who are celebrating.

It is also Native American Heritage Month. I look forward to learning more about Native American history past and present. Thank you to the elders and my relations who are generous with sharing their stories.


Today’s post is a list of commonalities about white people and white culture. There are always exceptions. If you are white and feel some way about this list, that is ok – you don’t have to be comfortable with it. As I wrote last week, there are always exceptions, and there is always truth to the larger whole. It isn’t meant to call out anyone in particular, but if you feel called out maybe ask yourself why.

I didn’t *just* realize these things about white people as the title says. I wrote that title because some of these were renewed realizations from dealing with white people this week.

  1. White people like to be comfortable – Always comfortable. Anything that disrupts that comfort is an inconvenience. As an example, take away a school bus so now white parents have to disrupt their workday to pickup a kid. It is too inconvenient and they need their school bus back. If they were thinking about racial equity, they would think about the larger educational system and use their privileges to make other arrangements, or lobby for restoring service for others not just their own kids.
  2. White people like convenience—Services must revolve around their needs first. If it doesn’t they need an apology.
  3. White people like to use the word equity, but only as it applies to their needs first.
  4. White people like to be brave—Bravery for white people is on a different scale than bravery for POCs. POC bravery often comes at a higher personal cost — physical safety, income insecurity, reputational loss, etc.
  5. White people like to make the rules. They don’t like it when their rules are not popular. See above about bravery. Bravery only extends when comfortable and convenient.
  6. White people still think Asians are white – I didn’t just realize this, but it was reiterated to me this week in several different ways. White people also think Asians are invisible, we exist only when they want to see us and exploit our culture or need something.
  7. White people like to be first in line. I see you parents rushing to make COVID pediatric vaccine appointments. I also see the government systems allowing the free-for-all versus prioritizing kids with disabilities, medically fragile children, or others who should have had the first few days of the vaccine release held for them. See the point about making rules, but still needing to be popular.
  8. White people bravery doesn’t extend to voting and electing POCs or women. So many white men were reelected.  
  9. White people use the word “I” a lot when talking about equity.
  10. White people like the idea of being ‘proximate’ to BIPOCs, but only if they are comfortable. Explained another way – move to a diverse neighborhood, but still hang with people who are white, shop at the stores that cater to you, visit the gentrifier coffeeshops, playdates with families who are ‘comfortable’ to be around.
  11. White people (some not all) are not happy about being mandated to do things and expect to be accommodated when they refuse to meet the requirements. Their comfort and righteousness over community good. I was at a COVID vaccine site to help someone get a booster. A white guy came in and said he wanted the J&J vaccine. The staff asked if this was his booster, he said no it was his first. We were all happy for him, but he quickly squashed that by saying he is being forced to get it, and he isn’t happy about it. His comfort is more centered than thinking about the greater community.
  12. Black and Brown people put up with a lot of white nonsense with more grace and humility than white people.
  13. People of Color are brave, comfortable with ourselves, and deal with a lot of white nonsense.

Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S., Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, Kimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

But… the Exception…

Pictures of lemons on a blue background, one lemon is cut in half placed cut side up. Photo by SHVETS production on Pexels.com

I know better than to slide over to the neighborhood Facebook group, but one day I did. It is just a different version of the newspaper comment section, except on Facebook, there are tiny circles with a profile pictures. The day I popped over to the neighborhood Facebook group was Indigenous Peoples’ Day. One of the Facebook posts that had a ton of comments on it documented vandalism at a local Catholic church. The vandalism was directed at the church for its abuses and lack of holding themselves accountable.

The comments went back and forth between “that’s horrible,” to “vandalism is never right,” to “yup the church deserved it.” There was also a vein of comments saying because the church serves a majority POC population they didn’t deserve the vandalism. This got me thinking about how hard it is to think about the whole and make sense of things through what we know as personal experience.

Often our brains want to make sense of a situation through the knowledge it already has. In this case, people know the local church and the people affiliated with it. They may not know the larger problem of historical church abuses, especially against Native and Indigenous people (i.e. cultural genocide through boarding schools) – this was important to note because the vandalism happened on Indigenous Peoples Day. We naturally want to make exceptions, “the church didn’t deserve the vandalism because they serve POCs, they didn’t cause harm,” versus understanding the larger context of how the church system overall allowed abuses to happen and still happen.

But…

This happens in other situations too. I’ve sat through many conversations where someone will say “but…

  • My best friend is Black
  • I’m married to an Asian
  • My cousin is disabled so I understand (I’ve said this. I cringe thinking about the poor person on the other side of that conversation.)
  • I went to a ‘poor’ school
  • I was a Peace Corps volunteer

All of these are trying to carve out an exception, trying to position either yourself or the situation as being the exception and therefore exempt from being racist, ablest, wrong, or to create distance and isolate the problem.

The problem is when we do this we’re not recognizing the overall systemic problem at hand. It can be true that a church can serve a majority POC population and still be wrong for the historical harms they perpetuated and have yet to heal from. A person can be racist and have a Black friend. It can be true a white man can be married to an Asian and not be woke. It is true, I can strive to be an ally to people with disabilities and still figuratively put my foot in my mouth and say dumb things.

Accepting the dissonance between the two is part of the growth process. This allows us the mental space to recognize there are systems—rules/policies, practices, historical tendencies, biases, etc.—that hold back many marginalized groups AND there are always exceptions to those groups. Racial equity and other forms of equity work recognize that exceptions are just that, exceptions, and we need to work to change the system to allow more people to be whole.

If you’re in a conversation and you feel the urge to say “but, [exception]” stop and stay quiet – let the moment pass. The conversation will be better if you don’t try to defend your thinking by pointing out the exception. The other person doesn’t need to know you were in the Peace Corps and that is where you think you learned about racial equity. Instead, use the time to listen to others, especially people who are impacted by inequities — they probably can teach you more about how to undo wrongs than your exceptional life.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S., Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, Kimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

Disability Is What We’ve Made It

October is Disability History month. Carrie, a frequent guest blogger, joins us to share about what disability means. Be sure to read her previous blog posts as well.


Artwork of Anita Cameron — Quote: Civil rights are not given you must fight to get them, then, you must fight to keep them. Black women wearing a blue beanie with Adapt on the front. Lower right, Black person face down being lifted by arms behind their back, lower left, Anita Cameron holding microphone in wheelchair, flag with red and white stripes, blue background w/ white dots in shape of a wheelchair.

By Carrie Basas

I was born with my disabilities. From birth to five, I had 38 surgeries and spent most of my time either in a hospital or separate school for disabled students. (If you’re feeling the word “inspiring” coming on, please stop and watch this TED Talk.) In both settings, I was surrounded by other kids who were experiencing medical or behavioral interventions to make them “more normal.” I saw a world that expected me to adapt to it. 

In third grade, I was mainstreamed to my neighborhood school. I became the only kid with a disability, or so I thought. Nondisabled people told me that I had won the prize of mainstreaming because I showed potential. I “fit in” better than my disabled peers that would continue to be warehoused. I missed them, but I was told that I was no longer them.

As a disabled kid, I defined disability in terms of what was happening to my body – the ways that I couldn’t get around in certain settings, the anxiety that I had about new activities where I had to create my own access, and the shame that I felt when people would stare at me. I didn’t see representations of disability that diverged from the idea of it being an individual physical, mental, sensory, or communication issue. 

Erin and I recently asked some kids how they would define disability. (Thanks to the families and youth who shared their definitions with us.) I appreciated the kids’ candor. Youth are working through their definitions with vulnerability:

  • Age 4: “I don’t know.” (Their parent was glad they had started the conversation.)
  • Age 4 (has disabled family members): “It’s people who use wheelchairs to roll and can’t walk.”
  • Age 5: “I think my only guess is someone who can’t teleport.”
  • Age 6: “I have not learned yet . . . Maybe it has something to do with having a big responsibility?”
  • Age 6.5 (that 0.5 is meaningful to the kid): “The opposite of ability.”
  • Age 9: “Something that causes someone to not have a body part or their minds think in a different way.”
  • Age 9: “Disability should not be called a disability, but rather a different ability.”
  • Age 10: “When people can’t really control certain parts of themselves.”
  • Age 11: “Disability is defined as anything that puts you at a lesser ability than most people, could be something like depression or autism or having no legs. Many things are disabilities.”
  • Age 11 (has a disability): “It makes you unable to move a body part or you don’t have a body part that other people have.”
  • Age 11: “When you’re not able to do something—from ‘dis’ meaning ‘not’ plus ‘ability.’”
  • Age 12: “I think disability means that you are physically or mentally unable to do something, but this doesn’t mean a person is not capable of other things, like if a person had a physical disability, they could be really good at math or something and vice versa for a person with a mental disability.”
  • Age 12: “Something that affects your everyday life and you can’t control it. And it’s usually something mental or physical.”
  • Age 13: “Something that makes it harder to do something.”
  • Age 14 (has a disability): “Ask Google. A physical defect that the typical person probably doesn’t have.”

I viewed disability as an individual medical issue for almost 20 years until I found mentors who introduced me to disability communities. I stopped thinking that my impairments were the problem and acknowledged that disability was put on me by others. Disability is a social experience of discrimination, stigma, and alienation. How do we choose who has a disability and who just has a health condition or a different way of being in the world? Our lines are arbitrary. I struggle with a world not designed by or with me and the negative attention that I receive, especially the charitable “you’re so inspiring” moments. They aren’t about me; they are about others’ discomfort. Being in community with other disabled people and claiming our pride are the positive parts of disability and ones that we don’t see in mainstream media.

While once presenting to health officials, I tried to explain how I gave up on being normal, even though I’ll never fully exorcise internalized ableism. One of the participants challenged me: “Why wouldn’t you try to be normal? Why wouldn’t you want that?” He didn’t accept my answer that I could never reach that goal; it is a mirage that makes me feel like a failure. Most days, it is not my body-mind that is unwieldy. It is how others react to me.

Youth, too, are asking what disability means in society. Naming our reactions to someone else’s body or mind helps us to question who decided what was “normal”:

  • Age 6: “It’s when you’re still trying to find and learn how to use your hidden superpower.”
  • Age 10 (has a disability): “Something physical or mental that makes someone different. Sometimes people’s disabilities give them more abilities, like my ASD makes me smart but doesn’t make it easy for me to understand people.”
  • Age 10 (intellectually disabled): Conversation with parent: “What’s a disability?” Young person points to themselves. Parent: “You?” Young person: “Yes, I’m cool.”
  • Age 10 (has a disability): “Disability can be physical or emotional or invisible like my ADHD.”
  • Age 11 (has disabled siblings): “That’s a question because it could be anything. Disability could be anything.”
  • Age 11 (has disabled family members): “Disability affects the brain or body. Most people who have a disability also have possibilities.”
  • Age 13 (self-identifies as autistic): “Something physical or mental that prevents someone from acting like a ‘normal’ member of society.”
  • Age 14 (disabled little-person and neurodivergent): “It means you are unique. You see the world from a different perspective from regular people. Overall, it’s wonderful.”
  • Age 15 (attends a school for neurodiverse students): “It can be a physical or mental challenge that can present difficulties. But also something that could be worked around.”
  • Age 17: “When someone has something about them that society says is ‘not normal’, whether it be mental or physical.”

There are two parts to disability: what is happening to our body-minds and how it is stigmatized in society. We can build inclusive, justice-centered communities where we honor all ways of being and dismantle barriers that keep disabled youth and adults socially isolated and marginalized. We might never reach teleportation together or have exciting superpowers, but we can hold ourselves, disabled and nondisabled, accountable for creating belonging and pride. It is a “big responsibility,” as the six-year-old said.

Shameless plug: Watch some amazing student videos to get this conversation going.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S., Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, Kimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.