Spring Book Guide

First, many of us are thinking about the state of the world. The invasion of Ukraine by Russia is a violation of all of our safety, peace, and boundaries. War does not have victors; violence produces more violence. I am holding space for remembering there are separated families caused by this conflict in both Ukraine and Russia, food insecurity, economic instability caused by sanctions, and fear. We also need to remember there are other places around the world struggling and need attention – Tonga is rebuilding after a recent volcano eruption, Haiti, Palestine, Afghanistan, and within the US and your own communities. Pay attention to Ukraine and do something to support Ukrainians and others too.


Picture of mugs sayings Read Rise Resist. Photo credit Erin Okuno

The days are getting a little longer every day, hooray, and it also means it is time to share new to me books with all of you. All of the books are by POC authors or about disabilities.

Why books

Yesterday, I was talking to an African American colleague, and we traded parenting stories. The punchline to one of our exchanges was “yeah, read a book and call home…” That sums up reading for me at the moment — read a book and related it back to home (broad meaning of home). In relating it back to home and sharing the ideas with others we can reflect and grow our thinking.

Young Adult and Graphic Novels

Run by Rep. John Lewis. If you read the March trilogy, this is an extended part of that graphic novel set. Reading this posthumously published graphic memoir helped me to understand the Civil Rights movement between August 1965 and June 1966 more clearly.

Last Fallen Star by Graci Kim. My kid came home raving about this book. Her school librarian read her class the first part in school and she excitedly asked me to get the book from the public library. It is fab – pop Korean culture, meets fantasy, and adventure. We’re looking forward to reading the next book in the series.

Allergic by Megan Wagner Lloyd. This graphic novel is helpful for explaining allergies to kids, including the feelings of wanting something they can’t have due to the allergy. I’m including this title since it promotes disability awareness.

I Can Make this Promise by Christine Day. This is one of the Seattle Public Library Global Reading Challenge books. My kid and I have been reading through the list and I’m glad this one was included. It is a middle-grade book (ages 8-12) told from the perspective of a tween who is figuring out who she is as a Native American. The author is Native American – Upper Skagit.  

Baby Books

Sumo Opposites by Sanae Ishida. During mid-winter break I stopped by a book store and saw this book on the shelf. It is a fun board book for babies to learn the concept of opposites.

One, Two, Three Dim Sum: A Mandarin-English Counting Book by Rich Lo. This is a bilingual book, Mandarin Chinese and English. Finding bilingual books takes a bit more work, so keep this title handy if you are looking for a nice Chinese-English baby gift.

Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors by Hena Khan is a favorite picture book. I was excited to see this in board book format. The illustrations and narrative make this book a great reading experience to share.

Proud to be Latino: Food/Comida by Ashley Marie Marieles is a bilingual Spanish-English board book. The illustrations are colorful, bright, and flavorsome.

Picture Books

One of my favorite categories of books – picture books.

The Year We Learned to Fly by Jacqueline Woodson. This is a new release by Jacqueline Woodson and it is a gem. It references COVID life indirectly and encourages children to see beyond what they see in front of them: “Use those beautiful and brilliant minds of yours. Lift your arms, close your eyes, take a deep breath, and believe in a thing. Somebody somewhere at some point was just as bored you are now.”

From the Tops of the Trees by Kao Kalia Yang. I enjoyed the author’s previous books and was excited to see a new title. As I read through the story I wasn’t feeling the book until the end, and it was worth reading to the end. Make sure to read the author’s endnotes.

My Rainbow by Deshanna Neal. There are many children’s picture books talking about hair diversity, this one adds to the diversity and richness. In this book, a family looks for ways to help Trinity, a transgender daughter, and sister, have hair like her doll.

You Are Not Alone by Alphabet Rockers. This is a great book to share with a class or any kid who needs to feel like they belong, foster empathy, and encourage conversations about how we can create belonging.

Reading Books – aka Adult Books (anyone can read these not just ‘adults’)

Together: The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World by Vivek H. Murthy, Surgeon General. Surgeon General of the US, Viviek H. Murthy has opened up an important conversation about mental health. There are a lot of interesting anecdotes in here to learn from, even if you don’t read the whole book it is worth a heavy skim.

Call Us What We Carry by Amanda Gorman. This is a timely book of poetry that for me built off of the poet laureates inaugural day poem.

What Happened to You by Oprah and Dr. Bruce Perry. I read this book during the summer and still think about what I learned through the book. Oprah’s skilled narration and Dr. Bruce Perry’s extensive brain development knowledge come together to explain a lot about trauma and development. The book format is great, as is the audio version which they both narrate. (Dr. Bruce Perry is white.)

Eid Al-Fitr Mad Libs: World’s Greatest Word Game by Saadia Faruqi. This is not a reading book, but an activity book. Who doesn’t love a good MadLib, here is one by POC author about Eid Al-Fitr. Eid 2022 is coming up 2-3 May, order your MadLib now to make sure you have it in time for Eid.

Cookbooks

The Korean Vegan Cookbook: Reflections and Recipes from Omma’s Kitchen by Joanne Lee Molinaro. I just got this book from the library and now want to go to H Mart to buy all of the ingredients to make Korean rice and the other delicious looking dishes.

New Native Kitchen by Chef Freddie Bitsoie and James O. Fraioli. I just picked this up from the library and thumbing through it I am learning a lot about Native culture and appreciation for the foods I have it my own pantry. Such as that bottle of agave in your kitchen, it took a plant seven years to mature and once tapped for the nectar will die. I will not take agave for granted anymore – I appreciate this cookbook for reminding me that food is sacred.

On the nightstand list

Here are a few books I’m excited for, but haven’t read yet.

Inclusion on Purpose by Ruchika Tulshyan. Inclusion of women of color in workplaces (and other spaces) doesn’t just happen because organizations proclaim it. Author Ruchika Tulshyanshares why it takes intention and purpose. Make sure to check out her speaking tour too, she’s brilliant to listen to.

This Is Ear Hustle: Unflinching Stories of Everyday Prison Life by Earlonne Woods (Author). I enjoy the podcast by the same name.

What are you reading? Share your books with me at fakequity@gmail.com or Twitter @Fakequity.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

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If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up-to-date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

EO 9066

Replica of EO 9066, photo taken at MOHAI museum Feb 2013

Note: No blog post next week. It is mid-winter break for me.


19 February 2022 will mark the 80th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order No 9066 (EO 9066). This was the order signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and sent 120,000 West Coast Americans of Japanese descent to internment camps.

The terminology of what we call these prisons changes from person to person. Some people call the camps internment camps, which other people consider marginalization of what they were – they were prisons. They were also called ‘segregation camps’ by the government. Others say concentration camps is more accurate since that is what they were, they held and imprisoned Japanese Americans. The use of the term concentration camp is not meant to be a comparison to the concentration camps in Europe that were used to commit horrendous crimes against Jewish people. The US government ordered its people, its military, to collect people who hadn’t committed any acts of war or crimes against their government to be imprisoned.

This action changed the course of many Japanese American lives. Researcher Mae Ngai said “At the time of the internment, almost nobody opposed it. … There was widespread support for the internment because of racism and because of the government’s claim that Japanese-Americans were a national security threat.”

Japanese Americans lost businesses, homes, financial assets. They lost their freedom, they lost friends, lovers, and communities. While many people today look at Japanese Americans as a model minority, there is a lot to unpack under that label. Japanese Americans who lived through the trauma of being held indefinitely transmitted that trauma to their children – be quiet, study hard, choose ‘safe’ jobs, don’t stand out. Undoubtedly many who lived through the camps experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There is research showing worse health outcomes for adults who lived in the camps and earlier deaths.

It is clique to say history matters. In order for history to matter, we need to remember and act on what we know. I grew up in Hawaii among a strong Japanese American community. I learned about the internment in school. I heard stories about it, even though in Hawaii Japanese Americans were not interned. I learned about the injustices of these actions through stories and through books. It confuses me when I hear people didn’t learn this part of American history in schools or really anywhere. How could you not know this painful part of American history?

Learning about the history is important because it prevents the same mistakes from happening again. Immediately after the 9/11 bombing then Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta was instrumental in shaping the US’s response, including not targeting Muslims. He recalled his experience of being held in an internment camp (he refers to them as internment camps) and denied his liberties.

Psychotherapist Satsuki Ina has spoken extensively about the harms family separation at the US Mexico border has on young children. Ina was born and lived at Tule Lake prison camp until she was two-and-a-half. Actor and activist George Takei has also spoken out about the eerie parallels between locking up children and families at the border to his five-years in an internment camp. As he wrote in the journal Foreign Policy “At least during the internment, when I was just 5 years old, I was not taken from my parents.”

Being Japanese American today

Being a Japanese American today means I carry this history forward. While my family was sheltered from the internment because they lived in Hawaii, I am not immune from the effects of the internment. I now live a short distance from what used to be a robust Japan Town in Seattle. The Japanese diaspora is more scattered now, the communities that once thrived in places like Seattle’s International District and Bainbridge Island are no longer held in place. We are here in Seattle and the surrounding region but the haunting of the past are still here.

There are many Japanese American contributions to America that came in spite of the incarcerations. Landmark court cases that protect our civil liberties today were birthed out of this tragedy –Hirabayashi v. United States and Korematsu v United States to name two of many.

Our history is deep and continually building upon itself.

To learn more:


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

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If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up-to-date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

Broken Hallelujahs

Picture of two orcas swimming. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

A colleague asked me yesterday how I decide what to write about each week. I joked if you were with me earlier in the week there is a good chance you’ll recognize the theme or topic. I’m not a disciplined writer with a slate of topics, researches them, and writes in advance (maybe in another life when I’m not working full time). I sometimes wish for that discipline. I write from the immediacies of the moment, the gut moment, the emotional side. Honestly, I don’t really want to write right now. The past few weeks have been filled with a few deaths, including one this week. The lizard brain side of me doesn’t want to think hard.

As I thought about what to write, I turned on a podcast of a conversation with monk and teacher Thich Nhat Hanh. Listening to his wisdom the lessons of mindfulness and suffering came through. Krista Tippit, the interviewer, asked him about affinity group retreats and trainings he held – such as for law enforcement, congressional members, people of color. The reply was he needed to understand their unique sufferings to prepare for their retreats and to understand how to do the deep listening to communicate and understand.

Softening of the Heart

Last week I attended the homegoing (African American Christian memorial) for a friend. Nicey watched my babies when they were at her childcare center and we stayed connected through the years. The Reverend talked about how we are all connected to Nicey and how we will all need to adjust to life without her in big and small ways. Some lost a close family member, some like the Reverend talked about how he lost a friend and the person who remembered him every father’s day, birthday, and Christmas – she would bring him two-dozen cookies.

I took away from this that when we suffer, we can remember the suffering and pain and harden or we can look for ways to soften the heart and connect differently. When we break, we can repair our wounds in ways that are mindful and present. There is a Japanese art of taking broken pottery and repairing it with gold lines. It is often seen as a metaphor for suffering and recovery. There is a lot of metaphors around this for how we relate to each other around race and conflict.

We are all broken in different ways, and when we listen, communicate, and see the shared suffering we can heal and be joined together in ways that highlight our shared suffering and humanity.

Hallelujah

Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah showed up on my YouTube channel. It is haunting and pure poetry. In looking up the song this interview popped up:

“This world is full of conflicts and full of things that cannot be reconciled. But there are moments when we can… reconcile and embrace the whole mess, and that’s what I mean by ‘Hallelujah’.

The song explains that many kinds of hallelujahs do exist, and all the perfect and broken hallelujahs have equal value.”

I hope you also find some broken hallelujahs and connect with someone who needs to not be alone or feel broken.

Be sure to watch this version of Hallelujah performed by the Soweto Gospel Choir.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Andrea J., Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barbara B., Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Gail, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, Selma, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up-to-date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

Asian Joy

Happy Year of the Water Tiger and Lunar New Year. Lunar New Year (LNY) is a very important day for many Asian communities. Since it past, but we’re still in a celebratory mood from LNY I thought it would be a good time to think about Asian joy.

Why Asian Joy

The words Asian and joy are not often seen together. I did a quick online search to read up on the topic, and the first few results was a cargo ship named Asian Joy and many restaurants with names including Asian and joy. Twitter, TikTok, and Instagram gave me more results – hooray to everyone who is finding and naming #AsianJoy.

As I started to think about what Asian joy means to me and others, it occurred to me that to think about joy, we also have to understand the opposites of joy –marginalization, invisibility, assimilation, historical traumas, otherness, etc. Much of the Asian American experiences have roots and feelings in these areas. These are not unique to just Asians – these are universal emotions, and many POCs across race groups have experienced these feelings as well. For many of us, our Asian joys emerge from these feelings of otherness — we find and hold joy in fighting to hold on to our Asian-identities.

Pile of shoes — Asian house

What is Asian Joy

I asked my diverse Asian American friends to share their joys. Our ancestors’ migrations and diaspora stories are vast, but we have common threads that bind the pan-Asian American experience. Our Asian experiences are different and complex. But many of us have shared Asian joy experiences:

  • Walking into the house and seeing shoes neatly lined up by the door, or in some cases a giant jumble of slippers, shoes, and footwear.
  • Family and friend dinners and meals with foods from our cultures or adaptations and mixing of food.
  • Multi-generational gatherings or living. Watching grandparents and great-grandparents sharing cultural and language knowledge. Including documenting and keeping stories shared.
  • Recognizing each other as Asians.
  • Hearing home languages, dialects, and slang used.
  • Representation in arts, media, etc. Representation in movements including the disability rights movement.
  • Perfectly cooked rice, boba drinks, hot pot dinners, and hole in the wall restaurants with amazing food. (+1 joy point for supporting Asian businesses.)
  • Getting good grades. This is feeding into the stereotypes, but there is a lot of historical baggage to unpack around needing to prove worthiness in America, to provide for family, and coping with and dealing with racism.

The complexities of Asian joy are deeper than those bullets above. Such as representation in the arts and media is joyful, because Asians have been absent or tokenized in media for so long. One friend shared how she got teary watching Diana Huey, an Asian, play Ariel in the Little Mermaid at Seattle’s 5th Avenue Theatre. Seeing an Asian in a role that has traditionally only been played by white people gave many Asians a sense of belonging and breaking an artificial barrier placed by white normative society. Another friend said she cried listening to the Second Wave podcast by host Than Tan exploring the Vietnamese immigrant experience. Hearing stories she could intimately relate to and knowing it was her story was important. As my friend said “When you’ve been ignored or invisible for so long it becomes second nature, so when something disrupts that and you become visible, it feels seismic inside. It’s like you didn’t even know you were hungry for that experience.”

Other friends talked about finding joy in sharing values including Confucian value of honoring and respecting elders, humility, and honoring community needs over self-interest. These are deeply ingrained in many Asian cultures.

Many of us find joy in finding each other and having pan-Asian diaspora experiences. To others we may be labeled as Asian, but within the Asian community, we see each other’s ethnic and cultural differences as joyous ways of sharing. I joked with a friend about having to untangle the different mahjong rules because different cultures play with different variations – Filipino rules, Chinese rules, and the mixed host rules. Same for rice dishes – so many different variations of rice dishes that link our common Asian identities but are unique to cultures, regions, and ethnicities. And many of us find joy when we spot the perfect fusions of our shared identities – the umami of being together that lingers in joy.

As I mentioned earlier some of these joys are found despite and in-spite of being seen as ‘othered’ or invisible. Among my Asian women cohort, we know and we joke about being mistaken for the “wrong Asian.” People see average height, dark haired, Asians and we become interchangeable which erases our individual achievements and contributions. There are times we find humor in this – it makes for easy April fools jokes where we trade nametags or name tents at meetings or in COVID life changing your Zoom name.

Joy All Around

I want to keep writing and sharing the joys we find. There are so many more, I haven’t touched on. I’ll end with a few of my Asian joys. Joy in making my great-aunt’s andagi recipe (Okinawan donuts), I feel like I’m reclaiming a small bit of my Okinawan history and heritage that faded because of assimilation, time, and place. Reading and sharing books by Asian authors with my kids – books they enjoy and can relate to as multigenerational Asian Americans. Walking into an Asian grocery store and knowing the whole store is about the Asian food experience and not being relegated to an aisle or packaged foods. I get excited knowing at H Mart I can easily find purple sweet potatoes. My ears perk up and my brain lights up when I hear people speaking pidgin English and saying “Where you from?” the Hawaii ex-pat code on the mainland.

These are some of the small joys I share with my Asian community. Claiming them is part of my Asianness and my Asian joy.  

A special thank you to my Asian friends who trusted me with their stories and joys for this post.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barbara B., Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Gail, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, Selma, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up-to-date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

Should I Sign-Up – a flowchart

First, Happy Almost Lunar New Year! Lunar New Year is 2 February, thus this is the last blog post before Lunar New Year. Make sure to read some of Fakequity’s past Lunar New Year posts, such as last year’s where I just posted pictures of everyone’s delicious LNY foods. Happy Year of the Tiger.

Today’s blog post is a flowchart to help people figure out if they should sign-up for things. I started thinking about this during the release of COVID vaccines, especially the teen and pediatric versions. Those vaccines were released without prioritization on who should get it first. I watched as parents tripped over themselves trying to book, some might say ‘score’ appointments. I also watched as people with privileges would book appointments at POC clinics even though they had never used those clinics before or stopped to think about who those clinics served. This flowchart can also be used for other things like asking yourself if you should sign up for certain programs or benefits. It is most helpful for thinking about limited resources — not as my friend “don’t use it to think ‘should I buy oranges from Safeway or the POC grocery store.”

Like many things on Fakequity, the flowchart is meant to be tongue-in-cheek, don’t take it overly seriously. It is meant to be a bit of a joke and to remind ourselves to be human and mindful of each other. The serious version of this post can be found here.

The image is not screen reader-friendly. I promise to get a text version up, just not at this moment (I need to go to bed). Until I can properly format it, here is the text not laid out well:

Should I Sign-Up?

Do you know the organization? Yes / No

Is the resource scarce, limited, etc.?

Learn more about the organization

Do you know someone with the organization

Are you in their target demographic?

Are you displacing or taking resources from someone in the target demographic?

Would they invite you to participate? Yes / No

Do Not Proceed Look for other resources

Proceed thoughtfully and respectfully

Are you geographically close?

Proceed with caution – ask before joining, join waitlist, etc.

Do you have access to the same resource elsewhere?

Special thanks to several friends who suggested the idea of a flowchart; they saw early versions of this scrawled on paper and said it wasn’t totally terrible.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Gail, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up-to-date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

2022 Culturally Significant Dates

Picture of a plant on a white background with an online calendar reminder

This post is always a joy to write. An annual list of culturally significant dates to think about, pay attention to, and learn more about. Pull out your calendars and make note of these dates.

Notes about the list: This list was originally put together through crowd-sourcing dates from friends, colleagues, and some basic internet research. There are biases in the list since it was put together in this way. There are also local and regional practices, spellings, or observation differences than what is listed — please consult your local communities. As the editor of this list, I do not include US holidays or Western and Christian dates (i.e. Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Labor Day, Christmas, etc.) since those are easily found on Western calendars. The point of this list is to highlight and bring forward dates that may slip through Western calendars. Please email fakequity@gmail.com if you spot errors or omissions.


2022 Culturally Significant Dates

  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – 1/17/22
  • International Holocaust Remembrance Day — 1/27/22  – annual date 1/27
  • Lunar New Year (Chinese) – Year of the Tiger/ Tet (Vietnamese) / Seollal (Korean) – 2/1/22
  • Setsuban, end of winter start of spring (Japanese) – 2/3/22 [Edit added 1/30/22]
  • Maha Shivaratri (Hindu) – 2/28/22
  • Mardi Gras – 3/1/22
  • Hinamatsuri – Girl’s Day (Japanese) – 3/3/22 – annual date 3/3
  • Passover (Jewish) – 4/15 (starts at sundown)- 4/23/22 ends nightfall
  • Holi – 3/17/22 sundown, ends 3/18/22 sundown
  • Ramadan – 4/3 (sundown) – 5/1/22 (tentative dates, dependent on the sighting of the moon)
  • Eretria Easter – 4/24/22
  • Baisakhi / Vaisakhi (Sikh New Years) – 4/14/22 – generally celebrated on 13 or 14 of April every year
  • Orthodox Easter – 4/24/22
  • Ethiopian Orthodox Easter – 4/25/22
  • Eid ul-Fitr – 5/2/22 or 5/3/22 depending on local practices, most observe the date on 5/2/22, US date is Monday, 5/2/22, Kenya observes the Eid on 5/4/22
  • Children’s / Boy’s Day (Japanese) – 5/5/22 –annual date 5 May
  • Vesak / Vesākha / Vaiśākha / Buddha Jayanti / Buddha Purnima / Buddha Day (Buddhist) – 5/16/22
  • Kamehameha Day (Hawaii) – 6/11/22 – annual date 6/11
  • Juneteenth – 6/19/22 – annual date 6/19
  • Summer Solstice (northern hemisphere) – 6/21/22 @ 2.13 a.m. PDT, 9.13 a.m. UTC
  • Hajj (Islam) – 7/7/22 (starts evening) – 7/12/22 *some calendars have this date starting 7/8/22
  • Eid al-Adha – 7/10/22 or 7/9/22 or 7/11/22 (starts evening) depending on local practices, most observe the date on 7/10/22, US observes the date as 7/10/22
  • Liberation Day (Guam) – 7/21/22 – annual date 7/21
  • Enkutatash – Ethiopian New Year – 9/11/22, annual date 9/11
  • Mid-Autumn Festival / Mooncake Festival – 9/10 – 9/12/22
  • Rosh Hashanah – 9/25- 9/27/22 (starts sundown)
  • Yom Kippur – 10/4 -10/5/22 (starts sundown)
  • United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples – 9/13 – annually recognized
  • Lotu Tamaiti – White Sunday (Samoa) – 10/09/22 – Second Sunday of October, public holiday 10/10/22
  • Indigenous Peoples’ Day – 10/10/22 – observed the second Monday of October
  • All Saints Day – 11/1/22 (annual date 1 Nov)
  • Día de los Muertos – 11/1/22 – anual date 1 Nov)
  • All Souls Day – 11/2/22 – annual date 2 Nov
  • Diwali / Deepavali / Dipavali / Bandi Chhor Divas (Sikh) – 10/24/22
  • Transgender Day of Remembrance – 11/20/22 – annual date 20 Nov
  • Bodhi Day (Buddhist) – 12/8/22- annual date 8 Dec
  • Human Rights Day – 12/10/22 – annual date 10 Dec
  • Las Posadas and Noche Buena (Christian Latin American) – 12/16-24/22 – annual dates 16-24 Dec
  • Simbang Gabi (Filipino) – 12/16 – 12/24/22
  • Winter Equinox (northern hemisphere) 12/21/22, 1.48 p.m. PST
  • Hanukkah / Chanukah – 12/18-12/26/22 (starts and ends at nightfall)
  • St. Nicholas Feast Day (Orthodox) — 12/6/22, some observe the date as 12/5/22
  • Kwanzaa – 12/26-1/1/23 – annual dates 12/26-1/1
  • Orthodox / Ethiopian Orthodox Christmas / Eritrean Orthodox Christmas (Note: Not all Orthodox celebrate Christmas on this day, many celebrate Christmas on 12/25, the 1/7/23 date follows the ‘old calendar’) – 1/7/23

New Years Dates

Many different cultures and religions follow different calendars which has their year starting at different times of the year. I enjoy breaking from the Western calendar thinking of January through December. I’ve been known to make a new year resolution on Jan 1, then say “Lunar New Year is coming up, I can start again!”  

  • Orthodox New Year – 1/14/22 (including even though it passed)
  • Losar / Tibetan New Year – 2/1/22
  • Lunar New Year (Chinese) / Tet (Vietnamese) / Seollal (Korean) – 2/1/22
  • Tsagaan Sar/ White Moon (Mongolian) – 2/2/22
  • Persian Nowruz / Iranian New Year – 3/21 – 3/22 – starts at 4.15 p.m. PDT, ends 4.24 p.m. PDT
  • Naw-Rúz / first day of the Baháʼí calendar – 3/20-21/22
  • Nyepi Bali Hindu New Year – 3/14/22
  • Ugaadhi / Telegu and Kannada New Year – 4/13/22
  • Baisakhi / Vaisakhi (Sikh) – 4/14/22
  • Thingyan (water festival) / Burmese New Year Festival – 4/13-16/21
  • Aluth Avurudda (Sinhalese New Year, Sri Lanka) – 4/13-16/22
  • Songkran (Thailand) – 4/13-15/22
  • Khmer New Year – 4/14-16/22
  • Bun Pi Mai (Lao) – 4/13 or 4/14/22 or 4/13 – 4/16/22 *please check with the local Lao community on when they observe Bun Pi Mai
  • Bengali New Year, Pohela Boishakh – 4/15/22
  • Matariki, Maori New Year (New Zealand) – 6/24/22
  • Al-Hijra / Muharram (Islamic / Muslim) – 7/29 – 7/30/22 *check with your local Muslim community on when they observe Al-Hijra
  • Enkutatash / Ethiopian New Year – 9/11/22
  • Rosh Hashanah – 9/25- 9/27/22 (starts sundown)
  • Diwali / Deepavali / Dipavali / Bandi Chhor Divas (Sikh) – 10/24/22
  • Guru Nanak Jayanti (Sikh) – 11/8/22

Monthly Recognitions

  • January – none
  • February –African American History Month, Black History Month
  • March – Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month, Deaf History Month (March 13-April 15)
  • April – Arab American Heritage Month
  • May – Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Jewish American Heritage Month
  • June – LGBT Pride Month
  • July – Disability Pride Month
  • August – Black Business Month
  • September – Hispanic Heritage Month (15 Sept – 15 Oct)
  • October – Disability Employment Awareness Month, Filipino American History Month, LGBT History Month
  • November – Native American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month
  • December – Universal Human Rights Month

Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up-to-date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

2022 Fakequity Omicron-endured Checklist

2022 Fakequity Omicron-endured checklist, pink background with gold stars

This week’s post isn’t the blog’s normal deeper dive into race or social justice issues. Like many others, I’m feeling the feels of 2022 COVID and omicron life. So instead of feeling sad let’s be honest about where we’re at and maybe poke a little fun at life too.

Give yourself one point for every item on the list you feel pertains to you.

  1. Frantically look up omicron symptoms on the internet. Wonder what alphabet officials will use next after they exhaust Greek letters. Better start learning the different alphabets and tones in Asian languages.
  2. Overbuying N95/KN95/KF94 facemasks. Is this the new toilet paper hoarding?
  3. The COVID19 rapid test you placed in your online cart are sold out when you’re ready to pay
  4. Barter for a COVID19 rapid test
  5. Your school pivots to remote learning. Bonus point if you discover your kid didn’t bring home a charger.
  6. Employers mandate travel with no disability accommodations
  7. Your phone app notifies you of a COVID exposure
  8. Says “This is crazy!” *Crazy should not be used as a synonym for dysfunctional (see ableism BINGO board)
  9. Someone you know whines about canceling their cruise or vacation to Mexico
  10. Someone talks about their temporary disability from working from home and too much screen time
  11. Sidewalk curb cuts are blocked by snow, rain, debris, unpicked up trash or recycling (postponed due to the weather), etc.
  12. You know someone who signed up to temporarily sub in a school – Hooray! Minus 1 point, Minus 10 if it is you doing the subbing.
  13. Ask on Facebook where to get a COVID booster. If you’re not on Facebook, you wonder if now is the time to reopen that dormant account to crowdsource an answer.
  14. FDA approves fourth or fifth or sixth booster
  15. Sees the headlines asking for blood donations and make an appointment – thank you
  16. Supply chain disrupts your order of books to prepare for MLK day, better order now before Juneteenth
  17. Watch TikTok vids and feel afraid for the next generation but you stay stuck watching TikTok for five minutes straight.
  18. Blindingly bright virtue signals by white folx who yielded a vaccine dose for gasp a POC
  19. Columbusing/discovering ethnic grocery stores because the local whole foods is out of stock
  20. Question if the amount of rain/snow/sun right now is related to climate change. Bonus point if you’re in the Pacific Northwest and experiencing the atmospheric river.
  21. Watched Encanto for the fourth time. Bonus if you have the We Don’t Talk About Bruno song now stuck in your head.
  22. Check COVID dashboards and marvel at the upward trajectory of the lines
  23. Ignore a school robocall, ignore a work email asking for something immediately since it is 2022 and everything is immediate but not really
  24. Deliver treats to your local school, they need a pick-me-up, minus 2
  25. Reschedule travel plans
  26. Reschedule a mahjong gathering (or other gathering)
  27. Walk the pandemic puppy, pet your pandemic cat, or feed your pandemic sourdough starter
  28. Wonder when Girl Scout cookies will be on sale again. Soon very soon! Find your favorite POC Girl Scout to place an order. If you don’t eat cookies, order them for a local school, they will appreciate the treats.
  29. Watch dog/cat/panda videos or this video of ostriches running on a city street (I’ve watched it multiple times)
  30. Register to Vote, update your voter registration address, or get someone registered. Minus five points if you do this. Seattle voters – be ready for the upcoming February ballot with two school levies on it.

1-10 points: You’re doing all right.

11-22 (22 because it is 2022) points: Hang in there. 2022 can only get better, right?

23+ points: Virtual hug to you. Go watch Encanto and look forward to eating Girl Scout cookies from the POC Girl Scout troop.

Special thanks to my almost twin Bao and KY for their help. Bao inspired this by creating a 2022 Blissful Pandemonium BINGO board that made many of us laugh and cry. Thank you to many others who inspired lines, including Carrie Basas who wrote the original Abelism BINGO where I stole and borrowed points from.

In 2022 I hope all of us find and keep friends as special as they are. We need each other and need to protect, care for, and love each other hard to come out of this pandemic together. This is the real lesson of this blog post, thanks for making it to the end of the post.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up-to-date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

2022 Fakequity Pledge — Home Edition

Fakequity Pledge 2022 – Home edition Picture of a black and white blanket in the background and a black coffee mug on a white and gold coaster

For the past four years, Fakequity has published an annual pledge. This is an annual list of things to think about and pledge to do better in the coming year. After writing the pledge for four years, I had a minor freakout about how to make this year’s pledge fresh and new. I almost thought about not doing it this year, yet as always happens while walking and listening to a podcast the thought of home. It feels like a fitting focus due to continued COVID pandemic life and the continued need to not gather and spread COVID’s omicron variant.

SOME NOTES: When I say home, I encourage you to define home in ways that work for you. Home can be the literal and physical place, or it can be extended to other places that you feel connected to. Some pledge points are meant to appreciate the neighborhood and city where you live, not just your physical home. Do not feel like you have to pledge to all of them at the same time. This is meant to be personal to each of us and to be used as a way of resetting or discovering new ways of deepening our commitments to racial justice and anti-racism.

In 2022 I pledge to:

  1. Know whose land I am on – learn about Native/Indigenous rights, lands, and people. Read the treaty/ies between the tribe who’s land your home is on and the government. (With thanks to J.L. for teaching me about the importance of Native treaties.)
  2. Correctly say the name of who’s land you are on – properly pronounce the tribe and nation names of Native and Indigenous people.
  3. Not use the word decolonize unless your Native/Indigenous. Example, I will not say “I will decolonize my diet/bookshelf/backyard plants,” “We decolonized our Thanksgiving by…” Native/Indigenous people have asked non-Natives not to use the word decolonize as a metaphor (see link).
  4. Learn about my personal culture by reading a book, watching a movie or documentary, listening to music by a creator who identifies the same. Understanding our personal culture and beliefs is important to understanding others.
  5. Cull my books and media (e.g. podcast, social media feeds, apps, etc.) for items that no longer fit your racial beliefs. As an example, growing up I loved the Little House on the Prairie books. As an adult I’ve learned more about the author’s beliefs about Native Americans and choosing not to keep them. Same for the Harry Potter series due to the author’s transphobic beliefs.
  6. Name, call out or call in, people who say or perpetuate racism, especially when it happens in our homes.
  7. Shop at POC locally owned businesses, perhaps in walking distance to your house to invest hyper-locally.
  8. Learn about how housing contributes to generational wealth and racial wealth disparities.
  9. Make my home more accessible – clearly list house numbers, if people are picking up things from your house and you have stairs offer to move the item to a more accessible spot, keep sidewalks clear, request the city put in curb cuts, etc.
  10. Walk the neighborhood. When we walk we discover new things about the neighborhood and can grow connections and appreciation for the diversity in it. Recently I noticed a huge heritage tree in someone’s back yard. This tree is over 100 years old. Had I been in the car I wouldn’t have noticed. While this doesn’t have a lot to do with race, it helped me appreciate, discover, and be open to learning more about the neighborhood overall. While not everyone is physically able to walk, tailor this point to however you choose to appreciate your neighborhood outside of the normal.
  11. Appreciate local street art, especially by artist of color. Bonus: research the artist or art, especially if the art is featuring a person of color.
  12. To remember people make towns/cities/neighborhoods function. Consider the service workers and people who take care of the place you consider home. What is the racial makeup of the people who serve your town/city/neighborhood? (With thanks to @ainamomona on Instagram for sparking this thought.)
  13. Register to vote and vote if you are legally able to. Help others understand local political issues. Follow POC voting guides. Voting in local elections is important for POC interest.
  14. Engage in a meaningful way with the people who make my home possible. Think about the POCs who interact with your house and how to make your home more welcoming for them.
  15. Thank my home for being a space of peace, reflection, and reflection of self. Marie Kondo (KonMari) does this very well if you want some inspiration.

Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

2021 – Recap, a conversation

This is the last blog post for 2021. I’m taking winter break off. Hope you enjoy this tongue-in-cheek recap of the year. I wanted to revisit the year to maybe remember a few wins, a lot of misses, and just reflect in a not-so-serious way.

Friend: How was 2021?

This is what my conversation would sound like if I were telling someone about 2021.

Me: The year started like a bad hangover from 2020. You remember that year, it was the year we stayed home because of COVID-pandemic. It seems like a blur now. There were small glimmers of hope as vaccines were starting to roll out at the end of 2020.

Friend: Oh, yeah I remember. I slept through new year and the first few weeks of 2021. Trump was still president.

Me: Yup, Trump was still in office. If you were sleeping the first few weeks you missed the Jan 6 Insurrection. People, many of them white supremacists took over the Capitol. Like broke windows, forced their way in, then they acted like tourists taking pictures. One dude walked out with a podium, and another guy was dressed wearing horns and red, white, and blue face paint. Get this Trump even said he loved them, after he told them to go home AND they all just walked out, no arrest.

No way that would have happened at a Black Lives Matter peaceful protest.

Friend: Sheesh, that was only Jan 6!

Me: At least in January we got to see Bernie Sanders wearing mittens. He became the best meme of 2021. Amanda Gorman stole the show as the poet laureate at the inauguration. And Kamala Harris became the FIRST African American and Asian VP!

Friend: I miss those Bernie mitten memes.

Me: Spring was better, hope was alive again. People were getting vaccinated. I’ll admit I was super annoyed with all of the white folks who were jumping the COVID vaccine queue cause they HAD to be first in line to get vaccinated.  

Friend: So typical.

Me: Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, had a fascinating interview with Oprah about why they split with the Royal family. At least in my circles it sparked a lot of interesting conversations about race, colorism, and proximity to whiteness.

Friend: Yeah, I wasn’t going to watch it, but I kept hearing about it and how they referred to the royal family as “The firm.” I also had to look up how to curtsy correctly in case I ever meet the Queen. The poor Queen lost her husband too right after that interview aired.

Me: In April Derek Chauvin, the white police officer was found guilty of killing George Floyd. A 22 ½ year sentence, not nearly long enough for taking a Black person’s life.

Friend: I remember that moment. Sadly, right after that, there were more police shootings of Black people. That long arc of justice is hard to find.

It’s only April in this recap?

Me: Ok, we’ll fast forward to May. NBC announced they won’t broadcast the Golden Globes awards due to the lack of diversity. And tennis player Naomi Osaka pulled out of the French Open citing her mental health. This turned out to be a teaser for the summer Olympics and Simone Biles.

Friend: What was going on with COVID around this time.

Me: COVID, right. The euphoria of being vaccinated wore off as the Delta variant came through.

There was also the “heat dome” that blanketed the Pacific Northwest. It was miserable. 109-degrees in June. Climate change is serious! Oregon and the west coast burned. Yet, three rich white men (Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Richard Branson) burned ungodly amounts of fossil fuels to launch themselves into space for kicks and thrills.

Friend: Wasn’t one of the spaceships kinda weird looking? (You can go look it up.)

At least we had the Olympics this year. The GOAT – Simone Biles rocked the world when she took a stand for her mental health.

Me: Gotta fast forward the year. In September lots of kids went back to school. COVID was still raging with people who are unvaccinated, which means it is unsafe for everyone.

Thankfully pediatric vaccines are out now for kids age 5-11 years old. That led to another free-for-all with white parents insisting on being first in line to get their kids vaccinated. Like we didn’t learn the first time we did this.

There was also the US withdrawal in Afghanistan in 2021. Earlier in the year a lot of hard news out of Canada with their First Nations. We have a lot of healing to do.

Friend: Yes, lots of healing.

Me: Nothing huge happened in October. Just a rich white men got richer. Elon Musk made $25-billion in one day. Income inequality, wow. There was also a Facebook outage for six-hours in October – so many people didn’t know what to do during those six hours.

Friend: I heard something about another Greek letter, what was that about?

Me: Omicron. Only 7.5% of people in low-income countries are vaccinated against COVID so new variants popup. Omicron has a lot of mutations; so many unknowns with it. This is how income inequality plays out worldwide.

Oh, also during 2021 (March) there was that ship that blocked the Suez Cannel. Like when I-90 was blocked by a semi. Maybe we should all just stay home for the rest of the year.

Friend: Yeah, but I miss people.

Me: I miss you too, but you need to get your COVID booster and flu shot too, K.

Friend: Ok, see you in 2022. Hopefully, no insurrections, pandemics, or heat domes happen in 2022. Something will happen, cause it always does, but let’s hope for less dramatics.

Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Beth, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.

Relationships — who are you with?

I just finished the book What Happened to You?, which talks about trauma, healing, and the brain. It was fascinating. One of the lessons I took away from it is we are relational beings and others can help us heal and grow. I knew those lessons from before, but reading the book helped to reinforce the message and add deeper nuance. I also learned we gain benefits from small therapeutic moments – healing and therapy doesn’t have to be reserved for once a week in a therapy session.

Relationships

Racial equity work needs relationships to move forward and change. Relationships and stories get encoded in our brain differently. They help us make sense of the world and how we want to relate to others. The bigger lesson I took away from the book is we benefit from having long-lasting relationships in place. For racial equity work this means we need to encourage people to get to know each other and weave support networks for each other. A one-time training won’t shift culture, it won’t fix the problems. Creating the conditions that foster ongoing and long-term relationship buildings can help to develop the resiliency and conditions to tackle tougher persistent problems.

I have my posse of text-a-friend people who help me problem solve things on the fly or exchange a story about something funny. These relationships are with a diverse set of people and over time they’ve shifted my thinking around race, disability, inclusion and other topics. We also sometimes get together in person and enjoy each other in those spaces as well. I hope you can find your posse.

Small and Brief and Ongoing

Racial equity work can happen in big moments, but sometimes those small moments are just as meaningful. Earlier this week I was texting with several different friends about the topic of classroom inclusion. They all provided important insights and differences into how to think about the problem I was facing which I appreciated. Their backgrounds and experiences helped me understand inclusion of disabled people differently which is important to how to react. I appreciated the trust we’ve built up over the years and how on a weeknight evening I could say “Hi, I have a problem can I run something by you?” and they said yes. This small-brief-ongoing nature gave me insights I needed and while not meant to be therapeutic or healing it was.

Alone to think — No Word Volcano-ing

In a different book, I’m currently reading the author writes about loneliness and ironically the counter to loneliness is being comfortable being alone. While I’m grateful to my friends who teach me about race, I also know I need to process some of the info alone – they don’t want me word volcano-ing all the time.

As we move into 2022 let’s find ways to nurture relationships so we can connect more, and create space and time to understand ourselves and others.


Thank you to our Patreon subscribers. At this time I don’t offer ‘extras’ or bonuses for Patreons. I blog after working a full-time job, volunteer and family commitments thus it is hard to find time to create more content. Whatever level you are comfortable giving helps to keep the blog ad-free, pay for back end cost, research cost, supporting other POC efforts, etc. If your financial situation changes please make this one of the first things you turn-off — you can still access the same content and when/if you are able to re-subscribe we’ll appreciate it.

Abby, Adrienne, Adrienne, AE, Agent001, Aimie, AlaynaAlessandra P., Alessandra Z., Alexa, Aline, Alison F.P., Alison P., Allison K., Amanda, Amber, Amira, Amy H., Amy H.N., Amy K., Amy P., Andie, Andrea, Angelica, Angelina, Ann, Ashlee, Ashlie, Avery, Barb, Barbara, Barrett, Becky, Brad, brian, Bridget, Brooke B., Brooke D.W., Cadence, Caitlin, Calandra, Callista, Cari, Carmen, Carol Ann, Carolyn, Carrie B., Carrie C., Carrie S., Caryn, Catherine L., Catherine S. x2, Cedra, Celicia, Chelsea, Christina, Christine, Clara, Clark, Claudia, Claudia A., Courtney, Crystal, Dan, Daniel, Danielle, Danya, Darcy, Darcy E., Deb, Denyse, Diana, Diane, Don, E., Ed, Edith B., Edith B. (2), Elizabeth, Elizabeth U., Emiko, emily, Erica J., Erica L., Erica R.B., Erin, Erin H., Evan, Francis, Hannah, Hayden, Heather, Heidi, Heidi H., Heidi N and Laura P, Heidi S., Hilary, Hope, J., Jackie, Jaime, Jake, Jane, JJanet, Jason, Jean, Jeanne, Jelena, Jen, Jena, Jenn, Jennet, Jennifer C., Jennifer M., Jennifer S., Jennifer T., Jennifer W., Jess G., Jessa, Jessica F., Jessica G., Jessica R., Jessie, Jillian, Jody, John, Jon G., Jon P., Jordan, Julia, June, Karen, Kari, Katharine, Kate C., Kate G., Kate T., Kathryn, Katie B., Katie D., Katie O., Kawai, Keisha, Kelly S, Kelley, Kelli, Kellie H., Kellie M., Kelly, Kim, KymberliKimberly, Krissy, Kirsten, Krista D.B., Krista W., Kristen, Kumar, Kyla, Laura T., Laura G., Laurel, Lauren, Laurie B., Laurie K., Leah, Lindsay, Lisa C., lisa c., Lisa P.W., Lisa S., Liz, Lori, Lori N., Lyn, Lynn, Maggie, Maka, Maki, Marc, Mareeha, Marge, Marilee, Mark, Marki, Mary, Matthew M., matthew w., Maura, McKenzie, Meghan, Melissa, Melody, Meredith, Michael, Michele, Michelle, Mickey, Migee, Mike, Milo, Mindy, Miranda, Misha, Molly, Myrna, Nancy, Nat, Natasha D., Natasha R., Nora, Norah, Norrie, Peggy, PMM, Polly, Porsche, Rachel G., Rachel S.R., Raquel, Raquel S., Rebecca O., Rebecca S., Reiko, Risa, Rise, Ruby, Ruchika, Sarah B., Sarah H., Sarah K.B., Sarah K., Sarah L., Sarah O., Sarah O. (2), Sarah R., Sarah S., Sarena, Sarita, Sean, SEJE Consulting, Shannon, Sharon, Shaun, Shawna, Shelby, Shelley, Skyler, Steph, Stephanie, Stephen, Su, Susan, Susan M., Susan M.x2, Susan U., Tallie, Tana, Tania DSC, Tania T.D., Tara, TerraCorps, Terri, Titilayo, Tracy, Tracy G., Tracy T.G., Tyler, virginia, Vivian, Will, Willow, yoko, Yvetteand Zan

If you subscribe to the blog, thank you. Please check fakequity.com for the most up to date version of the post. We often make grammatical and stylistic corrections after the first publishing which shows up in your inbox. Please subscribe, the sign-up box on the right sidebar (desktop version). To see what Erin is reading and recommended books check out the Fakequity Bookshop.

I am writing from the lands of the 29 federally recognized and non-federally recognized tribes in now Washington State, including the Coast Salish people — Duwamish, Muckleshoot, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Native American organizations that have treaty rights and have been here since time immemorial. I give my thanks to the elders, Native and Indigenous colleagues and relations, and the land itself. Fakequity pays “rent” to Native organizations in Washington and Hawaii; a small act to repair and work to be in more justice based relations.